The kiter runner touching moments


** The Kite runner spoiler **

I cried… I couldn’t hold my tears while reading different moments of the story. Injustice blows me always! I cried for Hassan when he got raped for standing up to Amir. I cried when Amir’s father got diagnosed of cancer. I cried for Sohrab’s attempt to suicide. I cried for Hassan’s loyalty and his devotion. I cried for the slavery unjust life he had to carry. I cried for the cruelty of humanity and the racism we carry in our hearts. A hazara, a shiite, it wasn’t worse in Afghanistan than it is in Jordan today. Different forms of slavery, no? Poor Syrilankis and Eygptians for us, each one of them reminds me of Hassan, and the tough life he had to carry (with a smile!).

At moments, I wanted to grab the pen of Khaled Al Husseni and draw my own lines. That rape scene was so frustrating, where for a moment, I wanted to put in my own hands and push Amir to take action, not only for Hassan, but also for his own sake as well. I don’t know really who suffer the most out of that scene, Hassan for actually getting raped, or Amir for the guilt he carried over his shoulder for the rest of his life. I know that I have lived Amir’s guilt throughout the story. I also still have a feeling of bitterness because of the sequence of events that didn’t allow Amir and Hassan to meet again. Sohrab may, at the end, became a sort of condolences to Amir, but that is not enough of a happy ending to me.

As Khaled Al Husseni said, life is not a Hindi movie. At the end, we usually don’t even know what to classify the outcome of the events of our lives. Good and bad moments come in different set of choices and out of hand events. Injustice, for instance, comes in different forms, whether it is human instinctive fear of rejecting the other, like in the horrible massacre of mazar al sharif, or maybe it comes from lack of actions like the day Amir stood still watching his best friend gets raped infront of his eyes, or even uncalculated mistake like the one Amir did when he told Sohrab that he has to put him in an orphanage for sometime in order to be able to take him to the USA, which resulted in Sohrab’s suicide attempt.

There was a moment where I wanted to scream out. Don’t stone those adulterers!!! It amazes me how inhumanly humans can really act! I was horrified when I learnt about Assef’s buying of little children! I cheered out when Sohrab hit him on his eyes. I wanted to take a knife and cut his throat as well so that he never does it to anyone else.

At the end, the book left me with sadness about the current situation in Afghanistan. 40 years ago, it sounded like a life in west amman. A liberal non-practice muslim father drinking in his own house and discussing religious teaching with his son. The worrisome of what a religious extremist ruling would do to this country is not uncommon in the Jordanian liberal community. It also made me think of how messed up this world can be! The USA, the country who supported the mojahideen in their war against communism, is the same country who hosted the Afghani refugees in the story, and the same country who is fighting Taliban right now in Afghanistan! Power plays change with time, and poor people live to pay the price! This work is a work of fiction, but it may be the closest to the truth than any news we have watched on TV.

The only thing that “The Kite Runner” misses is a stronger presence of women, but it is okay, Khaled seems to address that in his next novel “A Thousand Splendid Suns”.

15 thoughts on “The kiter runner touching moments

  1. Great novel indeed, I just finished reading it yesterday.I have to say that I really was taken with this novel. but you know what made me think a lot about the novel?When Sohrab goes to the hospital after cutting himselfs. Amir immediately thinks of only one thing:Praying to God to help hi, although he is not a religious man. He then realizes that there is God, that there should be a God. That God is present in that place.I loved the quote “God is in these places, not at Mosques” Referring to Hospitals. I work at a hospital, and I know that, I believe in that, I’ve seen it. I really was touched with that moment too

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  2. Sodomy in Afghanistan it seems is pretty common. One of the stories of how Mullah Omar (leader of the Taliban) rose to prominence was when he saved a couple of boys from sexual slavery by warlords in Qandahar. When the Taliban were driven out of Afghanistan after the American invasion, NATO military and other civilian NGOs noticed a strange behaviour among their old Afghan colleagues, in which they’d take little boys into their private quarters or into the woods after noon prayers. Whether they’re taking an afternoon <>siesta<> or participating in an Afghan ritual is up to your imagination.The Pashtuns have a famous saying, “Women are for procreation, while Hazara men are for love making”.

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  3. < HREF="http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft458006bg" REL="nofollow"><>“Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier”<><> by David Edwards< HREF="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWsmJIwe9Q4" REL="nofollow">interview<> w/ Ahmed Rashid, author of “Descent into Chaos” & “Taliban” < HREF="http://www.kit10.info/Khans%20&%20Warlords%20in%20Pashtun%20Society%20PART%201.pdf" REL="nofollow">Part 1<>“Khans and Warlords: Political Alignment, Leadership, and the State in Pashtun Society”< HREF="http://www.kit10.info/Khans%20&%20Warlords%20in%20Pashtun%20Society%20PART%202.pdf" REL="nofollow">Part 2<>< HREF="http://www.gutenberg-e.org/hanifi/" REL="nofollow">“Connecting Histories in Afghanistan”<> by Shah Mahmoud Hanifi< HREF="http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/02222008/watch2.html" REL="nofollow">interview<> w/ Sarah Chayes < HREF="http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/episodes/bitter-harvest/video-full-episode/664/film" REL="nofollow">documentary<>, “Bitter Harvest” (Afghan Opium trade) < HREF="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Logic_of_Violence_in_Civil_War" REL="nofollow">“The Logic of Violence in Civil War”<> by Stathis N. Kalyvashttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrKEaOeZs2o (Part 1)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5s8vn9mKZs (Part 2)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yIaCB9q5ng (Part 3)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTE6IVd0Jdw (Part 4)<>Red Mosque Siege, Pakistan<> (AlJazeera) <>after the Red Mosque Siege, Pakistan (AlJazeera)<>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XJZnESwcgo (Part 1)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30tGS-xDJg0 (Part 2)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Px4lhZzaRpA (Part 3)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAVv1epfbqk (Part 4)

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  4. < HREF="http://www.4shared.com/file/51439751/116b22bf/___.html" REL="nofollow">“Are We Muslims?”<> by Mohammed Qutb< HREF="http://www.scribd.com/doc/13273203/-" REL="nofollow">“Concepts Which Must be Corrected”<> by Mohammed Qutb< HREF="http://www.islamhouse.com/d/files/ar/ih_books/single/ar_5378.doc" REL="nofollow">“Victory of the Glorious”<> by Abd al-Rahman bin Hasan Aal al-Sheikh

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  5. I read this book like almost 2 years ago and it’s the book that got me to start reading again.I cried within the first few pages whenever Amir got aphone call from his dad’s friend and told him (I don’t remember the exact words) it’s not too late to be good now or something along those lines. I was like what on earth could he have done as a child that is making him feel he’s so bad? That moment in the book really touched me.

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  6. Tina says:

    You seem very sensitive and intelligent. That was a very moving review. I have been wanting to read the book for a while. I’m glad that I know what exactly to expect from the book.

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  7. Thaer, I cant waitto watch the movie!Tha2ir, you also finished reading it before yesterday?🙂That is a good line as well. God is in those place! People need hope, any kind of hope.Matt D.B., that is bad :S! Poor kids!Asoom, yes, that was a touching moment as well! Poor Amir🙂Tina, thank you. I highly recomment the book. Hope that I havent ruined it for you with the spoiler🙂

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  8. Brad says:

    <>Great review. You have to keep in mind the bigger picture in which these dramas unfold:<>Much of Pakistan operates under a <>“sense of siege”<> driven both by India’s aggressive diplomatic push into Afghanistan, and also cross-border attacks in territory long claimed by Afghanistan. U.S. policy is paralyzed by the political baggage of the <>“Global War on Terror”<>. The West badly <>overestimates<> Afghanistan’s ability to secure itself (i.e. the total annual cost of the Afghan military & police will fall short of the government’s total budget by about $1 billion in 2013). The <>Durand Line<> drives a significant amount of the conflict. Afghanistan will never be at peace so long as Pakistan is <>obsessed<> with India. The <>Taliban<> must be distinguished from al-Qaeda. Pursuing discussions, and being prepared to <>compromise<> on objectives that might not be vital, can produce the calm needed for permanent development to take place.

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  9. <>here’s a good little article:<>ON March 5, in the outskirts of Peshawar, Pakistan, forces believed to be affiliated with the Taliban bombed the shrine of Rahman Baba (born around 1650), the most revered Pashtun poet. The attack evokes one of the grosser Taliban outrages from the pre-9/11 era: the dynamiting in 2001 of the enormous stone Buddhas in Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Valley. < HREF="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/30/opinion/30feith.html" REL="nofollow">http://www.nytimes.com<>This use of bombs as cultural commentary is especially notable in that the shrine was sacred to other Muslims. It reminds the world, and especially complacent Muslims, that the Islamist extremists’ war is a civil war within Islam — and not just a “holy war” against other religions and the United States. It should show American policymakers the wisdom of working to persuade Pashtuns to reject the Taliban.The bombers took aim at the poet’s shrine because it represented Sufism, the mystical form of Islam that has long been predominant in India and Pakistan. The Sufism of Rahman Baba generally stresses a believer’s personal relationship with God and de-emphasizes the importance of the mosque. It refrains from exalting violence and war and praises such virtues as tolerance, devotion and love. Its practice relies extensively on dance, music and poetry. Some of Sufism’s most esteemed poets and scholars are women.<>One day, she was seen running through the streets of Basra carrying a torch in one hand and a bucket of water in the other. When asked what she was doing, she said:<> <>“I want to put out the fires of Hell, and burn down the rewards of Paradise. They block the way to God. I do not want to worship from fear of punishment or for the promise of reward, but simply for the love of God.”<><>Rābiʻa al-ʻAdawiyya al-Qaysiyya<>رابعة العدوية القيسية‎

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  10. Brad, thanks. That is a very large number. The world should be ready to hold responsibility towards the Afghani government.Chris Reeve, it is very interesting to know about Sufism. It sounds like a part of Islam that needs to be revived! I loved the poem!

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  11. Great review my dear … You have said it all .. it was the first book ever that made me cry and feel sorry for all those who suffered like the characters in the story because each character represents a true story on its own and the author is a genius in the way he connected the dots and created this masterpiece!You will love the movie because I found the choice of actors was excellent .. it was as if Amir and Hassan jumped from the pages to the screen especially with the smile that Hassan had on his face even in the saddest moments … I can almost see it now as I write these words … I agree with you about women presence in the story .. but I am currently reading his other novel “A Thousand Splendid Suns” and it is so full of women … and it is the kind of book that makes you so angry that you want to scream and I highly recommend it …Thanks again for sharing your point of view of the book … I really enjoyed reading it …

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  12. <>Remember that Fundamentalism is the lack of complexity, it is the lack of the shades of gray that exists and that Movements are interchangeable, that fanatics will often flip from one movement to another.<>Here’s a good book about the main tenets of the Salafi movement’s take on <>“Us vs. Them”<>:< HREF="http://izzatulillah.wordpress.com/2008/07/25/al-wala-wal-bara/" REL="nofollow">Al-Wala’ wa Al-Bara’<> by Muhammad Saeed al‐Qahtani <>(student of Muhammed Qutb, here translated into English)<>

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  13. Here’s two other books you might also enjoy reading:<>“the Ugly American”<>and <>“the Quiet American”<><>(in a way, these two books relate to what’s going on in Afghanistan–and Iraq)<>

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  14. I find this disturbing………………………
    Sodomy in Afghanistan it seems is pretty common. One of the stories of how Mullah Omar (leader of the Taliban) rose to prominence was when he saved a couple of boys from sexual slavery by warlords in Qandahar. When the Taliban were driven out of Afghanistan after the American invasion, NATO military and other civilian NGOs noticed a strange behaviour among their old Afghan colleagues, in which they’d take little boys into their private quarters or into the woods after noon prayers. Whether they’re taking an afternoon siesta or participating in an Afghan ritual is up to your imagination.

    The Pashtuns have a famous saying, “Women are for procreation, while Hazara men are for love making”.rbing…

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