Religion and Alcohol


Have you ever thought of the similarity of the effects of religion and alcohol on one’s life?

How awkward would it be to compare a belief system with a beverage? and how complex can the psychology of a human being be to allow such a comparison to take place? in the same line, how complex is the human behaviour? and to what extend can we measure the effect of thoughts and ideas on human behaviour vs substances and chemicals?

In truth, it is all translated into chemicals in our brains. Whether it is alcohol consumption or a hug from a lover, both results in some chemicals reactions in our brains. Substances like alcohol can be strongly addictive, but habits as well can also develop addiction too.

So what happens when someone develops a strong attachment to a certain religion? The changes in a person’s life style and his relationships with his environment can lead to a stage that is no less dangerous than a person suffering from alcoholism. Religious extremist abuse religion the same way an alcoholic abuses alcohol, they suffer the same symptoms from destroyed family relationships to hardship social interactions, and as alcohol can lead to death, manipulated extreme religious people may end up to be terrorists.

Karl Max was no wrong when he said that “Religion is the opium of the people”. Opium and alcohol both result in a distorted brain perseption.

Both religion and alcohol result in euphoria if consumed in a small quantities, it is ironic how this can explain how some muslims prefer joy coming from their faith rather than from alcohol. It is good as long it is conrolled where it doesn’t lead to addiction.

The bottom line:

‘Both God and wine are good for you, if taken in small doses’

17 thoughts on “Religion and Alcohol

  1. Well, the high faith brings makes me sharper, more loving more focused on others, more genuine, more kind.It sure beats the reality of many of my friends who have no faith. And I never get a hangover.🙂

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  2. VERY interesting perspective….i agree, over-obsessing religiously does have alot of symptims as over-drinking. Yuor bottom line is such an oxymoron (if referring to Islam as the religion :P)

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  3. Interesting comparison.This is also a good argument for those who chose to be somewhat religious.I’m not sure whether you know that, but Karl Marx was praising religions in this statement and not condemning them. He didn’t mean it as “distorted brain perception”, on the contrary he says “Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people.”

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  4. A bit confused in your comparison of excessive Alcohol consumption & Christian practice!?! Any/All alcohol has the ability to destroy anyones health, as it sees fit. Wether you over drink or over practice faith, is a bit uncomparible. My late husband & I were hit health wise from drinking socially and while raised Christians, since his passing, I've literally flung myself into a daily walk with our Saviour. And discovered, that HE does, like to be included in every days activity. You can't be the pest or pain in the butt you might think you are to HIM, as HIS love surpass's everything in this world!

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  5. Well, one difference between alcohol and religion, is that when you are consuming alcohol, you know that you are under the influence, and would question the validity of your experiences.But in religion, people don’t realize they are under the influence, and take delusions as facts.For me, thats the main difference. There is nothing wrong in altering your perception, as long as you admit that you are doing it.

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  6. kinzi, it is nice the effect of religion on you🙂. For others it comes in more stubborness, less tolerance, rigidness, and a behaviour diet that affects their relationship with people around them in a negative way.The same applies to the booze, people react in different way. Some are just so funny in their euphoria state and others just turn violent. and no, small doses of alcohol don’t get you a hangover, neither do small doses of religion bring you sin-phobia🙂secret window,🙂, I m glad you find it iteresting. I mean religion in general. zait o za3tar, I am glad you like it🙂husam, woohoo, I like such reactions. I am glad you like it. I am so lazy at the book front :Sa different perspective, I am sure Marx was praising the euphoria state. Sometimes reality needs a bit of distortion. It is bad when it goes to a higher stage where it becomes dangerous. anon, I was raised as a christian, but I am more of an agnostic now.sheila, hope it makes you happy. Just be aware of over-dose🙂DM, that is one difference that I failed to mention! hehehe. Sharp perception of you as always🙂I, sometimes, enjoy treating myself with a dose of religion while being aware of its delusional aspect. It is just as tempting as having a glass of wine😉

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  7. hmmm..It’s a bit confusing but I ll try to put things in order!At first you started with this question: how complex can the psychology of a human being be to allow such a comparison to take place? And I think it is simple, you are discussing two types of extreme behaviors; regardless to their nature or origin. You can find many other extreme behaviors in the human nature that can result in such dramatic outcomes; though maybe in a less statistic ratio and a less media propaganda, such as psychopaths who think of their behaviors as normal, and got their psychological disturbances from oppression or social problems.Then, you mentioned the changes in a person’s life style and his relationships with his environment after developing that connection with god; and here I ll have to stop and say that this exact thing gives a Muslim the joy coming from their faith as you mentioned, because religion is a lifestyle and a very organized and targeted one; which brings relief to this believer; of course any overdose of improper facts and distorted concepts will lead to the stage that is no less dangerous than a person suffering from alcoholism. It is always critical to incorporate terrorism to Islam, and I condemn the media and its victims to this.It is not wrong to be “addicted” to religion; the right belief and the true path of god; it purifies a soul and sets things straight. I’ll have to say I’m a strong believer that we can do better than sitting around blaming god for creating extremes! I know it’s bad to have to tolerate such results, but this is what the complex human psychology created.

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  8. “The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one.”George Bernard ShawI read this today and thought of your post, so I couldn’t help but share🙂

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  9. Yes it is correct indeed that too much alcohol consumption can lead to addiction. But take into consideration that alcoholism has serious effects on our health, and in our family relationships as well.

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